Planned Gifts

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Case Study

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The following is an illustration of how this type of donation works.

Alvin and Susan are no strangers to philanthropy. Each year since they have been married they have faithfully donated to a qualified charitable organization. But five years ago they discovered how to continue their same level of generosity at a significantly reduced cost: They make annual gifts using securities that are worth more now than when they purchased the stock.

Quick TipQuick Tip
To realize your charitable income tax deduction, make sure you itemize deductions on your federal income tax return.

The Situation
Alvin, a retired executive, was in the same position as many employees of successful companies: He and Susan owned a lot of stock in Alvin's former employer. Wanting to diversify their highly concentrated portfolio, they discovered that by selling the shares, they would face capital gains taxes. They soon learned, though, that there was a way to use their stock to its full value.

The Solution
When Alvin and Susan started making their annual charitable gifts using appreciated securities, they realized several benefits:
  • The organization still received the same amount of support the couple wanted to provide.
  • They were able to give their same annual gifts at a reduced net cost.
  • They eliminated paying up to 20 percent in capital gains tax.
  • They could remove some of the concentration in their investment portfolio.
eBrochures
Learn more about the tax benefits of donating appreciated property.

How You Can Help
When making charitable gifts using securities, see your investment broker to move the stock to your favorite charity. To discuss the good your gift could accomplish at WTTW11 | 98.7WFMT, please contact Kathy Kielar at 773-509-5553 or kkielar@wttw.com.






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The information on this website is not intended as legal or tax advice. For legal or tax advice, please consult an attorney. Figures cited in examples are for hypothetical purposes only and are subject to change. References to estate and income taxes apply to federal taxes only. State income/estate taxes or state law may impact your results.